I don’t know about you, but hair wash night hasn’t always been the most fun in our house! It’s one thing for the little ones to enjoy splashing around in the tub with their toys, but mention the shampoo bottle and the atmosphere tends to change somewhat! If this sounds familiar, don’t despair because you’re not alone! We’ve put together a few tips that might just make for a happy hair wash after all!

Tips for a happy hair wash~ cuddledry.com

Make it FUN!

Bathtime works better when it’s fun, and hair washing is no different. In fact, it’s probably more important to make hair washing a little more fun, seeing as many little ones tend to dislike it!  If your little one hates hair washing, why not try:

  • Bringing dolly into the tub and washing her hair firs. Play hairdressers and encourage your little one to praise her for being good etc- then refer to this when it’s their turn.
  • Pop a mirror into the bathtub. This can be a great way to pull faces to make your little one laugh!
  • Use a bath toy to squeeze water over your little one’s head- sometimes this can  be a great way to distract from what is actually happening.
  • Use foam bath stickers on the ceiling! When your little one pops her head back for rinsing, she’ll have something a little more fun to focus on.
  • Make foam sculptures on your little one’s head- again, use the mirror.
  • Make up some funny songs- probably the first thing that comes into your head, but that’s ok! Distraction is key here!
  • Let those with longer hair use the Cuddletwist after hair washing- they’re simple to use and make drying a lot easier!


Tips to make it painfree

Lots of children hate having their hair washed because they either don’t like their faces getting wet, or they are scared of having soap in their eyes. Make sure you choose child friendly shampoo that doesn’t sting the eyes, and try these tips too:

  • Use a shampoo shield to keep water and soap away from the face completely.
  • Let your little one wear goggles in the bath- this could be really fun too!
  • @cknursingbaby says “avoid getting bubbles in eyes by tipping head back whilst holding a rolled flannel to their brow & rinsing with a pot of water.”
  • Let your little one hold the flannel to her head- having a job to do will provide a distraction and allows her to feel in control of the situation.
  • If your child is younger and has less hair, use a washcloth to squeeze and wipe water over the hair until the soap has rinsed. This can be a wonderfully gentle way to do it.
  • If your little one dislikes tipping her head back for rinsing, let her lie down in the tub instead.
  • Use a large jug for rinsing rather than a small cup- often one rinse is enough to get all of the shampoo rinsed away at once.
  • Let your child help with rubbing in the shampoo, and rinsing the water. Congratulate her on a job well done!

Mix it up

If your little one really hates washing her hair, mix it up a little. Wash it less often if you need to, or make it different by washing it in a different room for a change. Some children respond better when their hair is washed at the start of the bath, as they know they have the rest of the time to play. Some children like to play first. Talk to your child and agree the best solution. Perhaps the shower is a better idea? Over the sink like at the hairdresser’s might work well too? You know your child best, so make the most of that knowledge.

Don’t stress

No matter what you do, some children just do not like having their hair washed. Don’t stress about it. As they grow older, most little ones grow to accept that hair washing is just something we have to do, and it will get easier and easier. Good luck!

A little while ago we wrote about ways that you can make bath time fun, and we thought it was time to revisit this topic for 2015! After asking around on Twitter and Facebook, it seems that you guys are the experts when it comes to having a jolly good splash at the end of the day! So this week we’re sharing some fabulous tips from real parents, with some of our own ideas thrown in too. Have fun!

Make Bath Time Fun_updated ~Cuddledry.com

Mix up your timings!

Who says bath time has to be at the end of the day every day? Yes, it’s a wonderful way to end the day before bed, and yes it’s helpful to clean the day’s mud and grime before they go to bed… but it can be fun to take a splash at other times of the day too. @rhubarb2rhubarb and @robertaknibbs say that mornings are the best time for them, straight after the school run. This tends to be the least rushed part of the day for many and can make for a nice little water play activity too.

Pop a duck in the tub!

We’re biased, but we think our Cuddleducks are the perfect bath time companions to start out with!

Make Bath Time Fun_updated ~Cuddledry.com

Some babies and young children can feel a little crowded if there are too many toys in the tub with them, so start out small. And you never know- you may end up with quite a collection like Zac’s mum (@cooksey_83)! On the other end of the scale, @hayleyfromhome swears the more toys the better, and all three of hers splash together each night!

Dress up!

Who says dressing up can’t be done at bath time? We absolutely say it can! Our toddler dress up towels are the perfect way to inject some fun into bath time, and what better way to fire their imaginations ready for a bedtime story? Look out for our dress up feature coming soon! In the meantime, why not try:

The Cuddleroar!

Make Bath Time Fun_updated~ Cuddledry.com

The Cuddlepony

Make Bath Time Fun_updated~ Cuddledry.com

The Snugglemonkey

Make Bath Time Fun_updated~ Cuddledry.com

The Cuddlebug

The Cuddlesafari

The Cuddlemoo

The Snugglebunny

The Snugglebear

Make Bath Time Fun_updated~ Cuddledry.com

The Cuddledeer

Tea for two?

Take your little one’s favourite toys into the bath- as long as they’re waterproof! @clairelpark’s little one takes teacups and saucers into the tub with her to make tea- how cute? No reason why dolly can’t get a bath at the same time, and while we’re at it I’m sure a good old fashioned car wash would be lots of fun too!

Paint the bubbles

If your little ones like a bubbly bath, this is a wonderful activity! Simply pop some food colouring and water into spray bottles and let them loose. Don’t worry about the mess! A variation of this activity is to use shaving foam mixed with food colouring, and big chunky paintbrushes so that your little ones can decorate the tiles. It all washes off easily, so relax and let them play!

Anyone for a spot of fishing?

Ice cubes in the bath tub are GREAT fun- and give your little one a fishing net to extend it even further! Can they catch the ice cubes before they melt? We love this idea!

Let them wear socks

This might sound strange, but try it. They will love the funny sensation of having something on their feet in the tub, and there is the added bonus that they won’t slip if they stand up too.

Have a sing song

A simple yet effective way to make bath time fun. Our favourite songs include: Raindrops keep falling on my head, I’m forever blowing bubbles and for more ideas have a look at this post here.

Keep up to date with our Pinterest board

We’ve got a new #MakeBathTimeFun board where we’ll be pinning our favourite ideas, so do keep an eye on it. And if you have any to add please let us know!

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Do you carry your baby in a sling or baby carrier? It can be a wonderful way to keep baby close, and has so many benefits for baby and parent. Babywearing, done safely, can not only help to strengthen your bond, but also provide you with two hands free so that you can continue to multi-task! We do love a clever idea here at Cuddledry HQ, and luckily this age old practise needs no modification at all. Here are a few babywearing safety tips to help you get the most out of holding your precious little one close.

babywearing safety tips~ Cuddledry.com

Why follow safety precautions?

The reason why safety is so important when you practise babywearing is simple. Your newborn baby’s neck muscles are not yet strengthened, and body control is limited too. Newborns also tend to sleep a lot, so if you’re carrying them you must be vigilant and aware of their safety at all times.

The universal babywearing safety checklist is called TICKS.

T - tight. Make sure that your baby carrier is tight enough, and that there are no loose straps at all. Wearing your baby close is important so that you are in control of supporting her entire body, and of maintaining the correct position as you hold her.

I – in view at all times. If baby is not correctly positioned and you cannot see her, you cannot know if she is safe.

C - close enough to kiss. Can you reach forward and kiss the top of your baby’s head? If so, then she is in the right place. If you can’t, you will need to make some adjustments. Maybe your straps need tightening, or your baby is too small for the type of carrier you’ve chosen.

K – keep chin off chest. Babies need a clear airway so that they can breathe easily. When you carry your baby, you are responsible for ensuring her head is in the right position, and her chin is lifted so that her airways are free.

S - supported back. Your baby’s developing spine needs protecting while you carry her.

Other precautions to take

  • When you carry your baby in a sling or carrier, make sure that the face is completely clear from fabric so that she is able to breathe freely. She needs to be able to breathe fresh air at all times.
  • Never run, jog, jump or shake while you’re carrying your baby. It goes without saying, but doing so can cause injury from falling, or baby slipping from her carrier. It can also cause damage to the spine or brain and should be avoided at all times.
  • Make sure your carrier is age appropriate, and checked regularly for signs of wear and tear.

Choosing a baby carrier

When it comes to choosing a baby carrier, please keep the safety precautions in mind. There are lots of different types of carriers, and some are not suitable for newborn babies. Some are intended only for babies over a certain weight, so if you’re not sure then ask. Check online for details of your local sling library, where you can go along and try out different carriers with advice from experts.

Always practise with a doll or a teddy before you place baby in the carrier. Make sure that you’re confident in tying and carrying and always check in the mirror or ask someone else to check your carrier is on properly. When you put your baby in the sling, always support her neck and head, and if she is older and able to support her own head, always support her back instead.

Every day safety tips

  • If you use a wrap and are trying out a new carry, always practise with a teddy or a doll first. When you do put baby into the wrap, do so over a soft surface.
  • Ask someone else to be on hand to ’spot’ for you- if baby does not look happy, or your carrier does not look right they will be able to tell you straight away.
  • Always tie knots into double or granny knots so that they are secure.
  • Make sure you dress your baby in weather appropriate clothes. In warm weather, don’t forget sunhats and sun cream for exposed arms, legs and faces. In cold weather, make sure these areas are covered well.
  • Don’t keep dangerous or precious items in places where baby can easily reach them. Some carriers have pockets that you can store things in- make sure they’re closed!
  • Don’t take unnecessary risks while babywearing. As a general rule- if you wouldn’t do it while pregnant, don’t do it while carrying your baby. So no ladder climbing or cycling please!
  • Don’t cook whilst babywearing.
  • Make sure that only responsible adults carry your baby at all times.

We all know the saying- sleep breeds sleep. And it really does. If your baby sleeps well during the day, chances are your baby will sleep well at night too. However, we also know that babies are not robots. They are all unique individuals and therefore the amount of sleep they get varies, and how they get to sleep can vary too. We’re huge believers in instinctive parenting and generally feel that if it works for you, then go with it. Take what you need from parenting manuals, and leave what you don’t like the sound of. Only YOU will know your baby best, after all. So, with this in mind, here are a few tips for better daytime sleep- take them or leave them, but if they help then great!

Tips for better daytime sleep~Cuddledry.com

Make naps a prioroty

Sometimes we can be so busy rushing from here to there, especially when we have older children to look after too, that naps can often come low on our list of priorities. If this is the case for you, you might find that your baby becomes over tired quite quickly, and then is harder to settle for a nap. Try to make naps a priority if you can, and plan your day around them as much as possible. Of course, there’s nothing wrong with sleeping while you’re out and about so if you can take the pram with you that’s fine. Keep in mind how long you’ll be out and whether or not there will be opportunity for your baby to sleep. By making naps priority, hopefully you will some improvement in your baby’s sleep overall.

Tweak your routine

Just as you need a good bedtime routine at night, having a good routine during the day can help too. If your baby knows when to expect a nap, good daytime sleep is a lot more likely in general. There’s no need to be rigid about timings etc- look for sleep cues and when your baby shows signs of being tired, make sure you are able to allow for sleep. Keep things in roughly the same order, rather than at the same time each day if you can.

Be consistent

Lots of us have busy lives, and we can’t always guarantee that we’ll be at home for nap time. But if you can, it might help if your baby can sleep in the same place each day. If you know that you’re likely to be out every day, make sure you use the same pram for sleeps, or a pop up bed if you’re able. At home, naps in bed are the best way to ensure your baby has a good sleep. Be consistent with whichever way works for you.

Don’t stress

Lots of parenting manuals will tell you to always put baby down awake but sleepy, and to never feed to sleep or use other ’sleep props’ such as music or a dummy. But you know what? Sometimes these things can be the difference between getting some sleep and getting no sleep. If it works for you, then why change it? Parenting should be about making informed choices. If you know that rocking your baby to sleep works for now, and you’re happy to do it then why stop? Don’t feel guilty about the decisions you make in the best interests of your baby, and don’t stress. They really are only little for such a short time!

Encourage baby to fall asleep independently

Yes, yes. We’ve just said that if you want to rock your baby to sleep then you should do it, and we stand by that! But if you do want your baby to learn independent sleep, daytimes are the best time to do it. From around the age of three months babies start to leanrn to self soothe and at this age you can start to give your baby opportunities to practise. Perhaps a cuddly blanket will help, or soft music etc. Your baby might sleep for longer stretches during the day once the art of self soothing has been mastered. Worth a try at least!

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It’s an exciting time for any family when a new baby is expected, and there’s every reason to celebrate the joyous occasion. That said, sometimes it takes careful consideration when you introduce a new baby to the family. How will siblings react? Where will baby sleep? How will baby slot into the daily routine? There’s a lot to work out, and you only have nine months to do it in! Here are some tips for helping you make the extension of your family as smooth as possible.

Introducing a new baby to the family~ Cucddledry.com

Involve younger siblings

Depending on their age, you might want to involve siblings as much as possible when baby is on the way- but choose your timing carefully. With some children, the concept of a pregnancy taking nine months to complete is difficult to understand, so if you don’t want to spend the entire pregnancy explaining why baby isn’t here yet, you might want to wait a while before you reveal all. Many couples wait until the 12 week scan before announcing a pregnancy, but you might want to wait a little longer with younger children.

Once the kids are in the know, involve them as much as possible. Talk to them about the new baby, let them help to decide on names and perhaps choose a teddy for their brother or sister. Once baby arrives, let them help with small tasks such as changing a nappy or helping with bath time. Answer as many questions as your little ones have, and take the time to reassure them that they are still loved just as much as they were before baby arrived.

Prepare practically

Once you know that baby is on the way, the whole family might need a little shuffle round. For at least the first six months, its recommended that baby sleeps in a crib in your room, so bedrooms don’t need to be switched just yet, but it is a good idea to start thinking about where people will sleep after that.

If you have toddlers still in a cot, you might want to consider moving them to a big bed. This can be a lot less disturbing if it’s done in good time before baby arrives, as the new addition in itself can be unsettling for some. If you prepare your toddler well in advance, when the baby arrives they are less likely to feel ‘pushed out’.

In the same vein as moving from crib to bed, other major changes in your toddler’s life should be timed a little more carefully too. Potty training can be quite disruptive to young children, so if your toddler is showing signs it might be an idea to tackle it now rather than wait until the baby arrives. It makes sense to take on one big change at a time!

Buying new baby items

It can be tempting to splash out on new baby items when there’s a little one on the way, but it makes sense to consider what you actually need before you spend. If you saved anything from previous babies, make use of them again! Ask around for recommendations on more expensive items, and refrain from buying too many clothes in newborn size. Wash all baby clothes well in advance and store carefully so that you’re not madly washing and drying when baby’s arrival is impending and you are heavily pregnant.

Consider visitors

When a new baby arrives, friends and family obviously want to visit you. This is lovely! But for younger children- and you and your baby- lots of visitors can be quite unsettling. Agree a limit on how many should visit in one day, and ask friends and family to check with you before they call. It might also be a good idea to spend some time with older siblings to explain that the visitors are for them too, now that they are a big brother/ sister. Some children can feel left out when a new baby arrives, so take the time to help them through it if this is the case.

Stick to your routine

When a new baby finally makes an appearance, the whole family may need to make some adjustments, but it’s important to try and stick to your usual routine as much as possible. For younger children, daily routines help to make them feel secure, and when things are disrupted for a length of time it can be very unsettling. If you can, keep to your schedule of baby groups and after school activities as much as possible. Enlist the help of friends and family who are keen to help out, and try to keep things as normal as possible at home.

What are your top tips for welcoming a new baby to the family?

You know it yourself- winter can play havoc with your skin. You go from warm indoors to cold outdoors and your skin lives to tell the tale. Central heating dries it out while winter winds can cause chapping and soreness too. During the cold winter months it’s not different for babies, which is why it’s important to take extra care to keep their skin protected as much as you can. Here are some tips on caring for baby’s skin in the winter.

Caring for baby's skin in winter~ Cuddledry.com

Protect

Your baby’s skin is a lot thinner than yours. and whatever you put on it is absorbed quickly. This also means that it is a lot more sensitive than yours too, so the cold wind and icy temperatures are likely to affect their delicate skin a lot more. With this in mind, its essential to protect that delicate skin as much as you can.

  • Layer up before you leave the house. Don’t forget mittens and hats too. Make sure your baby’s layers are breathable so that the skin is not too clammy underneath it all too.
  • Protect exposed skin on the face and lips with balm and a good moisturiser to stop it from drying out in the changing temperatures.
  • Protect baby’s chin and neck from dribble and drool. Use a good quality lip balm to stop them chapping and keep a dribble bib handy to keep moisture away from the skin.

At bath time

When you bathe your baby during winter, you will want to take precautions to stop them becoming too cold, so make sure you’re well prepared with everything you need to hand. Make sure the room is a nice temperature and let your baby spend time splashing in the warm water- but keep an eye on how quickly it cools down too as the last thing you want is a cold bath!

After bathing, take your time to dry the skin properly by patting and not rubbing. Have some extra cuddles with your Cuddledry apron towel while you do it!

When your baby is dry, apply a moisturiser all over the skin, to help counteract any dryness that central heating may be causing. This also helps to retain the skin’s natural moisture levels and to protect against cold temperatures outside, so don’t skip this step. It’s a great idea to use a good moisturising oil if you give your baby a massage, as this will help to soften the skin wonderfully.

Watch out for…

During the winter, skin conditions can flare up without warning, so watch out for signs that they may be getting worse. Conditions such as eczema can be exacerbated with colder temperatures outside and warmer climates inside, so check your baby regularly and see your doctor if you’re concerned. It’s also a good idea to watch out for frost bite in extremely cold weather- act immediately if you  believe your baby is affected.

If your baby does have a skin condition, you don’t need to have bathe them everyday- a good wash morning and night every other day will be enough, but make sure you don’t skip the moisturiser!

Bliss, the special care baby charity, provides vital support and care to premature and sick babies across the UK. Founded 30 years ago this year, we offer guidance and information at a critical time in families’ lives. We also fund ground-breaking research and campaign for babies to receive the best possible level of care regardless of when and where they are born. Today’s post is all about bathing your premature baby.

Bathing your premature baby~ Cuddedry.com

Your premature baby’s first bath is a very special and exciting yet often scary event for parents. It is best if you, the parents do the first and subsequent bathing so your baby feels safe and calm.

Wrapped bathing can be very relaxing and soothing for the baby, especially when they are small or still worried about being undressed. Bathing offers parents a valuable time for observing their baby’s behaviour so that the way you bath is adapted to his/her developing needs. Wrapping the baby in a sheet while he/she is immersed into the water and doing everything very slowly, pacing your washing in small bursts according to the baby’s reactions, will prevent tears at bath time and ensure he/she has enough energy to feed afterwards.

maggie hand on bliss kangaroo care cuddledry baby towel

Preparation:

The bath should be planned to enable you to:

  • Include dad or another family member if possible, as bathing is often a 4-hands job!

Before the bath:

  • Provide a warm, relaxing atmosphere, quiet and calm with soft background lighting.

  • Prepare all the equipment, clothing and cuddle towel first.

  • Prepare the baby by approaching quietly, talk softly before and during undressing the baby, and tell the baby what is going to happen at each stage.

  • While undressing the baby, provide hand and/or blanket support to keep the baby tucked up feeling safe and offer containment of any outstretched arms or legs as necessary.

  • Adjust the pace of what you are doing according to the baby’s cues (i.e. look for reactions that mean he/she needs a time-out pause (yawns, sneezes, breathing fast for example); proceed slowly.

  • Support the baby by holding hands or feet and keep one half wrapped while the other half is being undressed.

During the bath

  • Consider ways to help the baby feel secure and to avoid distress when naked and placed into the water e.g. wrap in a thin sheet or muslin.

  • When the baby is ready to go into the water make sure the water temperature has not cooled down too much.

  • Tell the baby what is going to happen all the time.

  • Immerse the baby into the water ……feet first STILL WRAPPED.

  • Make sure the water is deep enough to cover the baby’s torso.

  • Let the baby adjust to the experience of being in the water before washing or removing the wrap.

  • Allow the baby’s legs to be near the end of the bath to brace against so he/she feels secure.

  • Continue to go slowly pacing the way you proceed according to the baby’s behavioural cues.

  • Only uncover one body area at a time while you wash. Replace the wrap and then do the other body area.

  • Allow the baby opportunities to experience buoyancy if stable enough – a floating feeling on his back, side or front is very relaxing.

cuddle premature baby in cuddledry baby hooded towel

After the bath:

  • With the wrap left in the bath water, lift the baby from the bath on his side with the arms and legs tucked into his/her body.

  • Bend down to be near the bath as you bring him/her onto the towel, which is against the parent’s chest.

  • Keep the baby contained in the towel until the baby is settled.

  • When settled dress the baby keeping the top half covered, while drying and dressing the bottom half.

  • Consider Kangaroo Care after to help settle and re-warm the baby.

Result

  • Bathing is completed pleasurably, safely and effectively.

  • The baby’s stability has been maintained and the baby has enough energy to feed if necessary.

  • The parent and the baby have enjoyed the bath experience together.

  • Parents feel confident about carrying out bathing and supporting their baby through what is often a challenging procedure.

  • The neonatal staff have helped, supported and observed the baby during a challenging procedure and are able to assess and record the baby’s strengths and sensitivities.

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bath time and good baby sleep~ Cuddledry.com

Sleep is probably the hottest topic of conversation between new parents. We want it, and more of it, and we will do anything to get it. At the same time, our bundles of joy just don’t seem to understand this need we have for them to sleep well at night. Annoying. But there are ways that you can help them to learn good sleeping habits, and today we’re bringing you a guest post from sleep expert Wendy Dean Did you know that bath time can be an excellent way to ensure good baby sleep? Read on for more tips.

The Bath time ritual and a full night’s sleep

Tips from Wendy Dean author of the Baby Sleep System. Read more about her work here.

Wendy has worked with thousands of parents who have struggled to get their baby into a healthy sleep pattern.

A regular bathing ritual will help you prepare your baby for a quality night’s sleep.

Sleep cue

If you aim to bathe your baby at approximately the same time very night, it acts as a valuable “sleep cue” so that she knows that night time and therefore sleep time is approaching.

Preparing the body for sleep

The act of bathing itself is a relaxing experience which prepares the body for sleep. Ensure that the water is a pleasant temperature by using your elbow or a thermometer to test. Use a soft material to do the washing. Let your baby float in the water being careful to fully support his head and back.

Increasing trustBath time and good baby sleep~ Cuddledry.com

The post bath snuggle in a Cuddledry product builds a bond of trust between parent and baby which makes it easier for the baby to cope when he is put into his cot alone. Talk to your baby in a soothing voice.

Breaking the connection between feeding and sleeping

The bath if used as part of a bedtime routine can help to break the connection between feeding and sleeping which is at the root of many baby sleep problems. The bath should have pepped him up enough to take his feed without falling asleep.

Result

By including a bath in a regular bedtime ritual your baby will be relaxed and happy to go into his bed at night and will settle himself off to sleep. This in itself will help to reduce night time wakings.

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Maternity leave is a wonderful time in so many ways. Months that stretch out ahead of you. Time to bond with baby, catch up with friends and look take up new hobbies perhaps? Or perhaps not. However you spend your time away from work, chances are it will go all too quickly and before you know it you’re looking at going back to the office again. This can be a stressful time! This week we have a guest post from Emma at Find a Babysitter with her top tips on making the transition easy. Returning to work after maternity leave needn’t be a wrench!

Returning to work after maternity leave~ Cuddledry.com

Are you planning to return after maternity leave soon?  Deciding when (or if) to return to work isn’t easy, but once you’ve made the decision to return to work, there are things you can do to ensure a smooth transition from stay-at-home mum to working parent. Here are some tips from Find a Babysitter to help.

  • Sort Childcare: first things first – if you’re not the person who’ll be looking after your little one during the day, then who is? Arranging childcare is key to the rest of the returning-to-work process. Plan time to check-out nurseries or interview child carers, rather than leaving it to last minute.  At Findababysitter.com, our aim is to make life easier for busy parents by enabling them to search for child carers in their area online.  Your perfect Mary Poppins could be just a click away!
  • Have a Plan B (C, D and E)! Make sure you have back-up plans in place for all eventualities.  Who will look after your child if they’re ill and sent home from nursery?  Many of our childcare professionals have their emergency availability shown on their profile, so you can find someone at short notice.
  • Don’t Be Afraid to Cut Corners. Juggling work and children is tough, so don’t be too hard on yourself by setting your expectations to high. Shop online and have food delivered, hire a cleaner – do whatever you need to keep yourself sane.
  • Ease Yourself Back Into It. If you’re leaving your baby for the first time, try to have a couple of days with your baby in childcare before you return to work. That way you can deal with the emotion of leaving them before you also have to deal with work. If you can, why not use accrued holiday to work a few days a week and build up to full-time.
  • Don’t be a Doormat. Don’t feel pressured into taking on more than you can handle, at work or in your social life. ‘No’ is a complete sentence – don’t feel obliged to give a reason or feel like you have to make excuses. Try to keep work and home separate. Even if at first it feels unnatural, be strict about finishing work on time and not answering calls when you are at home.  If you stick to it, your colleagues will adapt to knowing that if they call you after work you won’t answer, so they won’t call you.

(Cuddledry Ltd. is not the writer of this copy and accepts no responsibility for its content.  This article been contributed to Cuddledry Ltd. by the author detailed).

As a new parent, one of the main things you want to achieve is a happy baby- and it’s little wonder why! Babies can’t communicate their wants and needs until they are around 6 months old, so before that all they can do is cry to alert you to the fact that they need something. And it’s up to you to figure out what it is and how to give it to them. Luckily, a baby’s needs tend to be fairly basic at first- being warm, fed and loved usually tops the bill for most. And in our quest to provide that love and warmth, we parents tend to look for ways that we can help our babies to understand that they can trust in us to meet their needs. This is where baby massage plays an important role. By gently massaging your baby’s body you are not only focusing all your energy on your baby, but you are showing love, providing warmth and even alleviating pain, stresses and anxieties too. What better way to end the day after a warm bath? We are huge advocates of baby massage (see this post from Mumma Love on the wonders of baby massage) and so today we’re bringing you some more information and advice, this time from Helen at New Stork Times. Please do let us know in the comments if you have any questions at all.

Helen Pritchard, founder of New Stork Times, is an experienced holistic therapist, infant massage instructor and mum of two.

Helen has found the Cuddledry baby towel the perfect addition to her baby massage classes…

Baby massage, Cuddledry towel – A perfect bedtime routine

Around the night time bath is often a good time to give baby a massage, as this helps to relax both you and baby ready for a good night’s sleep.

Babies need to feel secure, and a Cuddledry towel wrapped around the baby after bathing makes them feel safe and warm. It’s while they’re in this comfortable state that an infant massage can be of most benefit.

Baby massage has many purposes, not least of which is the fact that it helps you to bond with your baby in the early months. Bonding is essential as it will form the close relationship with your child that will last a lifetime.

A small baby soon learns that bedtime routine means experiencing pleasurable and comforting times with a parent. Massaging helps baby to relax, but it also aids waste elimination and calms the digestion. By massaging you are helping to boost the immune system, and increase blood circulation.Tips for baby massage~ Cuddledry.com

Bathing at the same time every night also makes the infant associate this with bedtime. The stimulation of the bath will encourage baby to stay awake whilst taking the bedtime drink, and then go happily to bed.

By slowly and gently massaging your baby whilst he’s surrounded by his Cuddledry towel, the feeling of security will imbed itself in your child’s mind. This will inevitably lead to a happy and relaxed baby.

Colic will gradually subside as the massaging helps the body to discharge the build up of wind in the intestines. The benefits of a good bedtime routine, and massage, will make the baby months a happy and relaxing time for all the family.

Find out more about Helen and New Stork Times on her website.

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